Archive | December, 2012

Science Cat Explores…

December 13, 2012

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The weather has been excellent here, so I’ve been scrambling to finish up those last few projects before winter *really* hits. We finally got our gas fireplace in.

With a little help, of course. Meet “Science” cat.

LivvyBoxed2

LOL. Wouldn’t she look adorable with a pair of hipster glasses, like the “real” Science cat?

siensekate235

What IS it with people taking photos of cats with glasses and bow ties, anyway? I’m seeing it everywhere! It’s kinda cute, but it’s got to be uncomfortable for the cats.

Anyway, we got heat in the living room, YAY for us. Just in the nick of time because the temps dropped that week. We still have no snow, which is quite unusual for Upstate New York. We got perhaps a 1/4-inch a few days ago. We’re 10 inches below normal rainfall, too (no complaints here), but I would like a little snow. Ah well, all in good time.

By the way, in the first photo, Livvy is inspecting the fireplace box that houses all the innards of the heater. She was hilarious, popping in and out and in again. She is getting very smart! She knows how to hook up a gas line and wire cables and install a toilet — more on that later.

Maybe she really IS a science cat.

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Doors, Boring Old Doors

December 13, 2012

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One of my earliest memories is walking though a beaded curtain in a doorway. I must have been about 2 or 3 years old. We’d gone to Florida to visit an aunt and I remember walking through one of the doorways in the house that was strung with long strands of pink, plastic beads. I was enraptured and walked through the doorway many times. The beads made a tinkling, snappy sound that appealed to me, enough to make me remember the experience years later. I’d never seen anything like it before.

Of course, today we’d consider hanging strands of plastic beads a choking hazard for young children. Back when I was a kid, I guess kids didn’t put things in their mouths as much and we had no choking hazard warning labels. It was tough back then, I tell ya.

I’m remembering those beads just because one of our doors fell off its hinges. AGAIN. This is the fourth door in this house to do that. The wood (hemlock) frames around the doors are so old and so soft that that old (solid wood) doors just give up the ghost after a while. We managed to screw that sucker back onto the frame but it wasn’t easy. It’s just a matter of time until another door decided to jump ship…

If I had a more contemporary (or eclectic) style home, I would consider beads in the doorways, yes indeedy. Well, today it’s more likely to hang something like PVC Strip Curtains or something, for informal areas (such as doorways leading into a game room or teen’s closet or the garage). No choking hazard. The stuff allows heat to pass through, too. You’ve probably seen them in the car wash or at automotive shops, but those are rather ugly, if you ask me. You can get them in a few colors and in varying widths today. My teenaged son would probably LOVE black curtains for his room. He’s at that age where black is “in.” Pink is such a nice color and I told him so, but he won’t believe me. 😉

Anyway, the PVC thing is interesting. Would you ever install something like that in your home? I might in a garage where such a curtain would block dust and automotive smells but still allow warmth between the rooms…. but I’d have to get an attached garage first, yeah. That’s a whole ‘nother ball game.

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Tiling a Kitchen with Travertine Tiles

December 12, 2012

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The light pastel shades and subtle pattern of travertine tiles has made them a popular choice for kitchen interiors. Travertine tiles can be used to good effect in creating the classic farmhouse style kitchen decor, in which they are usually complemented by other natural materials like wood and stone. You can eliminate the cost of acquiring the services of a professional tiling contractor by tiling your kitchen yourself. With the correct planning and preparation laying a travertine floor or wall splash back is not as difficult as you may think. Firstly, it’s good to know a little bit about travertine tiles before you use them on your walls and floors.

A little about Travertine Tiles

Travertine is a sedimentary rock formed near hot natural springs. It is a type of limestone, with both these varieties of natural stone sharing similar characteristics including the occurrence of fossils and a porous nature. Travertine tiles are extracted from quarries in large blocks. To counteract the holes in travertine it tends to be ‘filled’ making it a suitable wall or floor covering. Travertine tiles are usually filled with an epoxy resin to give them a greater level of porosity. The next step in making them a practical choice for kitchens and bathrooms is called ‘honing.’ Travertine tiles are honed through an abrasive process which helps to make its surface smooth and even. The extent to which the travertine is honed will determine the finish of the tile. A medium hone creates a matt finish. Travertine tiles with a matt finish are the most popular for kitchen and bathroom floors, where they provide a high level of slip resistance. More extensive honing will result in a high polish. Travertine paving for outdoor areas is tumbled with the use of rock and debris to produce a chipped edge finish and incredibly rustic appearance.

Laying Travertine Tiles on a Kitchen Floor

Preparing the surface

Honed, matt tiles like the Light Travertine Floor and Wall tile are a very good choice for kitchen tiles. Your kitchen floor needs to be prepared first before you lay a single tile. You should ensure that the surface of your floor substrate is flat and even and that the adhesive you are going to use will easily adhere to it. The floor may require priming to make it suitable for tiling on to. The floor must also be fully cleaned with all dirt and debris removed so the adhesive can set evenly.

Marking out and dry laying, cutting tiles

With a tape measure and piece of chalk mark the mid points on all four walls. With the chalk draw lines across the floor from each mark to the mark on the adjacent wall. This should leave you with a grid containing four sections. Dry lay a row of travertine tiles from the centre to the wall of one of the sections. Use tile spacers to establish grout lines. You should then be able to work out the cuts you need to make. Tiling from the middle will ensure that the cut tiles are only used on the outskirts of the floor. Travertine tiles usually require cutting with an electrical wet saw as they have a greater density than standard ceramic tiles. Travertine, however, provides a harder wearing surface than ceramic.

Tiling with Travertine tiles

Choosing the correct adhesive is important in ensuring your tiles adhere to the underlying floor securely. For travertine tiles on a kitchen floor a flexible adhesive is recommended. Tiles can contract and expand with changing temperatures and a flexible adhesive will make breakages and cracks less likely on such occasions. Spread adhesive from the middle and lay the tiles just as you did in the dry lay you had carried out earlier. If you have little experience of tiling or this is your very first DIY tiling job then it is recommended you choose a standard adhesive opposed to a fast set variety. Standard adhesives take a lot longer to set than fast set adhesives which will enable you more time to carry out the job. Remember to start in the far corner opposite to the entrance of the room. This will ensure that you don’t box yourself in and end up having to walk back over tiles you have just laid. Standard adhesive can take around 24 hours to set. Once the floor is set you can seal the tiles. Sealing travertine tiles will prevent the surface from absorbing moisture and staining. Read the instructions on the sealant packaging carefully. Sealant can normally be applied simply with a spray bottle. Once this has dried you can grout the gaps created by the tile spacers. Waterproof grout is the best choice for kitchens and bathrooms. Once the grout has dried this can also be sealed by the same method but any excess grout on the surface of the tiles must be cleaned away first.

Travertine Mosaics

You can complement your travertine kitchen floor with a travertine mosaic wall design. Travertine mosaic tiles create a stylish backsplash above worktops and oven hob areas. Travertine mosaics are attached to mesh sheets which can be easily cut and installed. A travertine tile backsplash provides kitchen walls with far greater protection than wallpaper or paint.

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Find the Kitty Friday: Snuggle Kitty

December 1, 2012

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It’s been awhile, but the temperatures have finally been chilly enough to send her snuggling. Whwre could she be?

Livvy Snuggling Undr Blanket

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